Archive for the ‘Serbia’ Category

  • Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone Found

    on Feb 7, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, News, Paleolithic, Prehistory, Serbia • with Comments Off on Half-Million-Year-Old Human Jawbone Found

    Scientists have unearthed a jawbone from an ancient human ancestor in a cave in Serbia. The jawbone, which may have come from an ancient Homo erectus or a primitive-looking Neanderthal precursor, is more than 397,000 years old, and possibly more than 525,000 years old. The fossil, described today (Feb. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE, is the oldest hominin fossil found in this region of Europe, and may change the view that Neanderthals, our closest extinct human relatives, evolved throughout Europe around that time. “It comes from an area where we basically don’t have anything

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  • Exhibition: “Central Balkan between the Greek and the Celtic world”

    on Feb 6, 13 • in Ancient Greece, Antiquty, Archaeology, Art, Articles, Cultural heritage, Exhibition, News, Serbia • with Comments Off on Exhibition: “Central Balkan between the Greek and the Celtic world”

    The exhibition “Central Balkan between the Greek and the Celtic world” is still opened for visitors in the Atrium of the National Museum in Belgrade (Serbia), presenting the artifacts discovered after a decade of archaeological explorations at the archaeological site of Kale, in Krševica near the town of Bujanovac.   Numerous remains of buildings, furnaces, pottery, as well as parts of unique system of water supply from the 4th century B.C. were found at the surface of 5 acres. The entire necropolis was organized according to Greek models, and it was inhabited during the time of Alexander

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  • HAEMUS organizes an educational tour to Viminacium, Lepenski Vir and Romuliana

    on Jan 17, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, History, News, Our Activity, Prehistory, Roman period, Serbia, Tourism • with Comments Off on HAEMUS organizes an educational tour to Viminacium, Lepenski Vir and Romuliana

    On March 30 and 31, 2013, Haemus will organize an educational field trip to the archaeological sites of Viminacium, Lepenski Vir and Felix Romuliana, the last being on the list of UNESCO since 2007. The tour is designed primarily for professionals from the field of cultural heritage in the Republic of Macedonia, as well as for students of archaeology, history, classical studies and all compatible disciplines. The main purpose of the tour is to present the management of archaeological heritage in the Republic of Serbia, represented by three main archaeological sites: Viminacium (ancient roman town)

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  • UAB archaeologist featured on BBC program “Rome’s Lost Empire”

    on Dec 20, 12 • in Ancient Rome, News, Romania, Serbia • with Comments Off on UAB archaeologist featured on BBC program “Rome’s Lost Empire”

    Ancient sites thought lost forever have been discovered with the help of University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) associate professor of archaeology Sarah Parcak, Ph.D. An expert in the field of remote sensing, Parcak spent months using advanced satellite imagery techniques to uncover long-buried sections of the Roman Empire. Her research has uncovered a host of hidden finds, including an amphitheater and the likely location of a famous lighthouse. Parcak’s journey will be documented in “Rome’s Lost Empire,” an 80-minute film that airs on BBC One on Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012, in the United Kingdom

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  • NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER – WESTERN BALKANS

    on Dec 11, 12 • in Albania, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cuisine, Cultural heritage, Culture, Kosovo, Montenegro, Music, News, Republic of Macedonia, Serbia, Tourism, Tradition • with Comments Off on NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TRAVELER – WESTERN BALKANS

    A National Geographic Traveler & USAID special supplement – The Western Balkans – Land of Discovery include 46 outstanding ways to Experience Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro and Serbia. Download – 3,17 MB A crossroads and a crucible, where empires met, fought and combined to form a kaleidoscope of cultures unique in Europe; where the Greeks, Romans, Slavs, Venetians, Turks and Austro-Hungarians each left their own indelible mark on the architecture, cuisine, languages, music and traditions of the region. Medieval Orthodox monasteries, Renaissance Catholic churches, mosques and minarets stand together within the same city

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