Archive for the ‘Romania’ Category

  • HAEMUS and new institutional cross-border partnership

    on Oct 15, 15 • in Bulgaria, Cultural heritage, Culture, Our Activity, Republic of Macedonia, Romania, Serbia • with Comments Off on HAEMUS and new institutional cross-border partnership

               On 13-14.11.2015, the members of HAEMUS were guests at the conference organized by the “Regional library “Mihalaki Georgiev“, celebrating 145 years of the library science in Vidin, Bulgaria. On 13.10.2015, Ms. Vasilka Dimitrovska, director of HAEMUS gave a speech about HAEMUS’s work and Open Educational Resources in the Republic of Macedonia in the last three years. The event was supplemented by a lot of presentations from librarians around Bulgaria, sharing their activities, ideas and perspective due to their work mostly with young people.  Conference poster for Vidin event (left) and Vasilka Dimitrovska, director of HAEMUS is giving a speech about

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  • Timisoara – An ancient Ottoman capital surfaces

    on May 13, 15 • in Archaeology, History, News, Ottoman period, Romania, Tourism • with Comments Off on Timisoara – An ancient Ottoman capital surfaces

    Little did I know that one my favourite piazzas in Romania was hiding a secret beneath its modern European facade. I’d heard rumours that Piata Libertati (Liberty Square) in the city of Timisoara was the site of a magnificent Turkish bath during the Ottoman era (1552-1716). But I’d never seen any sign of that world other than a small plaque with Arabic writing on the wall of a nearby building. Then in September 2014 I returned to the city on Romania’s western frontier and discovered something exciting: archaeologists had unearthed the 400-year-old bathhouse known as the

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  • Romanian cave holds some of the oldest human footprints

    on Jul 22, 14 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, News, Paleolithic, Prehistory, Romania • with Comments Off on Romanian cave holds some of the oldest human footprints

    Preserved Stone Age impressions were made about 20,000 years earlier than thought Human footprints found in Romania’s Ciur-Izbuc Cave represent the oldest such impressions in Europe, and perhaps the world, researchers say. About 400 footprints were first discovered in the cave in 1965. Scientists initially attributed the impressions to a man, woman and child who lived 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. But radiocarbon measurements of two cave bear bones excavated just below the footprints now indicate that Homo sapiens made these tracks around 36,500 years ago, say anthropologist David Webb of Kutztown University in Pennsylvania

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  • Declassified Spy Photos Show Ancient Roman Walls In Romania

    on May 25, 14 • in Methodology, News, Photo, Roman period, Romania • with Comments Off on Declassified Spy Photos Show Ancient Roman Walls In Romania

    Sometimes it pays to take a second look. Archaeologists from two United Kingdom universities examining declassified spy photos rediscovered part of a what they believe is a series of Roman fortifications dating back to the 2nd century A.D. Although parts of the ruins had once been known to 19th-century researchers, they were subsequently misidentified, dismissed and largely forgotten, according to Bill Hanson, a professor of Roman archaeology at the University of Glasgow. In some areas the structures were heavily damaged by ploughing or construction — even to the point of complete destruction. “If you look

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  • Transforming the rural fabric of the Carpathian Villages in Romania

    on Apr 16, 14 • in Architecture, History, Management, News, Preservation, Restoration, Romania • with Comments Off on Transforming the rural fabric of the Carpathian Villages in Romania

    The villages of Romania, particularly those in Southern Saxon Transylvania, are a unique survival. These villages, the hay meadows and the forests which surround them are a last outpost of a central European Medieval landscape, forming a vast and extraordinary ensemble stretching for 100 miles from East to West, and about 60 miles from North to South. The architecture is of very gentle and unique nature, or was until recently, built using stone from the nearby hills, lime from local kilns, oak from the deep forests and handmade bricks and tiles by the Romanians who

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  • Major archaeological discovery in Romania

    on Jan 3, 14 • in Archaeology, Excavation, News, Roman period, Romania • with Comments Off on Major archaeological discovery in Romania

    Archaeologists delved over 100 silver and one gold coins, along with more a few hundred small items, ten thousands pottery fragments dating from the Roman occupation of Porolissum Ancient Camp, in Salaj County (northwestern Romania). Ancient Roman archeology expert Coriolan Opreanu believes there was one of the local fairs where soldiers of the military strongholds located at the Roman Empire’s borders used to trade with the Barbarians. The discoveries have been recently made, during the archeological digs part in an European project aimed at the capitalization of the Ancient Roman Camps situated in the Salaj

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