Archive for the ‘Neolithic’ Category

  • CATALHOYUK MURAL MAY DEPICT ANCIENT VOLCANIC ERUPTION

    on Jan 9, 14 • in Archaeology, Neolithic, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on CATALHOYUK MURAL MAY DEPICT ANCIENT VOLCANIC ERUPTION

    Volcanic rock dating suggests the painting of a Çatalhöyük mural may have overlapped with an eruption in Turkey according to results published January 8, 2014, in the open access journalPLOS ONE by Axel Schmitt from the University of California Los Angeles and colleagues from other institutions. Scientists analyzed rocks from the nearby Hasan Dagi volcano in order to determine whether it was the volcano depicted in the mural from ~6600 BC in the Catalhöyük Neolithic site in central Turkey. To determine if Hasan Dagi was active during that time, scientists collected and analyzed volcanic rock samples

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  • Catalog – Prehistoric ladies from Macedonia

    on Dec 5, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Art, Cultural heritage, Eneolithic, Exhibition, Neolithic, News, Prehistory, Republic of Macedonia • with Comments Off on Catalog – Prehistoric ladies from Macedonia

       The abundance of terracotta figurines depicting women from prehistory. i.e. from the Neolithic and Eneolithic, discovered in the Republic Macedonia, have imposed the idea of conjoining the most of them together and displaying them in an exhibition titled Prehistoric Macedonian Ladies. It embraces an attempt to present, in a single display, archaeological artifacts that are inter-related merely by one concept – the woman. The exhibition aims to elucidate a segment of the rich spiritual life of the prehistoric populace settling these territories from the sixth until the third millennia BC. This collection has been

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  • Head of a goddess statue discovered in Aegean province

    on Nov 22, 13 • in Archaeology, Art, Excavation, Neolithic, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Head of a goddess statue discovered in Aegean province

    The head of an 8,000-year-old statue of a goddess has been found during excavations in İzmir’s Yeşilova tumulus. Associate Professor Zafer Derin said they had found very important pieces during this year’s excavations, adding that the four-centimeter head of the statue had a special meaning as it was the first of its kind discovered in Turkey. Women and fertility were sacred in western Anatolian culture, Derin said, adding that the area was the center of the mother goddess culture. “We have the head of a mother goddess figure. We know that worship of mother goddesses

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  • Oldest warning sign may be in Çatalhöyük

    on Nov 7, 13 • in Archaeology, Art, Neolithic, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Oldest warning sign may be in Çatalhöyük

    In a play on the old adage “if walls could talk,” a mural has been discovered that could be the world’s earliest warning sign, Daily Mail has reported. The 9,000-year-old painting, found on a wall buried in the ancient Turkish settlement of Çatalhöyük in the central Anatolian province of Konya, shows a village in front of an erupting volcano. Researchers now believe, through the use of mineral dating and geochemical tests, that the volcano shown in the painting is the nearby Mount Hasan, found 70 miles from the settlement site. It is thought the mural

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  • 6,000-Year-Old Wine Found In Greece – Ancient Samples May Be Oldest Unearthed In Europe

    on Oct 6, 13 • in Archaeology, Excavation, Greece, Neolithic, News, Pottery • with Comments Off on 6,000-Year-Old Wine Found In Greece – Ancient Samples May Be Oldest Unearthed In Europe

      Conventional wisdom agrees that a fine wine generally gets better with age — good news for the 6,200-year-old wine samples unearthed in Greece, huh? Researchers working at an ongoing dig site in northern Greece recently announced that the final results of residue analysis from ancient ceramics showed evidence of wine dating back to 4200 B.C., according to the Greek Reporter. The excavation, located at a prehistoric settlement known as Dikili Tash, is situated 1.2 miles from the ancient city of Philippi and has been inhabited since 6500 B.C., according to the researchers’ website. The analysis was not

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  • Soli Pompeiopolis archaeopark to open

    on Aug 27, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Conservation, Education, Hellenistic period, Management, Neolithic, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Soli Pompeiopolis archaeopark to open

     Neolithic and Hellenistic findings at the Soli Pompeiopolis will be displayed in an archaeopark. Professor Remzi Yağcı, who conducted the excavations, says the city dates back 2,000 to 3,000 years The ancient city of Soli Pompeiopolis in Mersin will have a new archaeopark. Professor Remzi Yağcı, who conducted the excavations in the coastal town Soli Pompeiopolis – which dates back 2,000 to 3,000 years – in the Aegean province of Mersin, said they were slanted toward reintegration of the historical area as an archaeopark for international tourism due to great Neolithic, Hellenistic and Roman findings

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