Archive for the ‘Neolithic’ Category

  • Ancient footprints discovered in Bursa

    on Sep 2, 14 • in Archaeology, Excavation, Neolithic, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Ancient footprints discovered in Bursa

    Footprints dating back to the Neolithic period (6,400 B.C.) have been discovered during excavations in Barçın tumulus in the northwestern province of Bursa’s Yenişehir district. Koç University academic, Rana Özbal, said works had been continuing in Barçın tumulus since 2007 under the coordination of the Culture and Tourism Ministry and the Dutch Research Institute. She said the oldest settlement in the region dated back to 8,600 B.C., adding, “The houses in tumulus are semidetached. In one of the houses, we have found a pair of footprints and now we are searching for how they appeared.”

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  • Retouching Tools from Osseous Raw Materials in the Starčevo Culture

    on Jul 10, 14 • in Articles, Bioarchaeology, Bones, Neolithic, Serbia, Technology • with Comments Off on Retouching Tools from Osseous Raw Materials in the Starčevo Culture

    Selena Vitezović Retouching Tools from Osseous Raw Materials in the Starčevo Culture Abstract Tools from osseous materials were used for a variety of tasks during prehistoric times – for processing organic materials such as leather, hide, plant fibres; but they may have been also used for the manufacture of flint tools, as percussors, hammers, retouching tools, or anvils. These are relatively easily identifiable through characteristic use wear traces and numerous examples of them were noted on sites throughout Europe, covering the span from the Middle Palaeolithic to the Late Neolithic / Chalcolithic. These tools are

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  • Göbekli Tepe, an early Neolithic wonder in Turkey – News in Conservation

    on Apr 23, 14 • in Archaeology, Conservation, Management, Neolithic, News, Prehistory, Turkey • with Comments Off on Göbekli Tepe, an early Neolithic wonder in Turkey – News in Conservation

    Place: Gobekli Tepe, Turkey TURKEY – Göbekli Tepe in south-eastern Turkey, is one of the most exciting and historically significant archaeological sites currently being excavated anywhere in the world. Dating to the earliest Neolithic period, its significance is demonstrated by its construction implying organisation of an advanced order not previously associated with early societies. Göbekli Tepe has been interpreted as the oldest human-made place of worship yet discovered. The Global Heritage Fund (GHF), the non-profit organisation working to protect, preserve and sustain the most significant and endangered cultural heritage sites in the developing world, has

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  • Bringing the Neolithic Figurines of Koutroulou Magoula Back to Life

    on Apr 7, 14 • in Archaeology, Greece, Neolithic, News • with Comments Off on Bringing the Neolithic Figurines of Koutroulou Magoula Back to Life

    Clay Neolithic figurines are some of the most enigmatic archaeological objects, which depict in a miniature form humans, animals, other anthropomorphic or zoomorphic beings, and often hybrid or indeterminate entities. Figurines have excited scholarly and public imagination, and have given rise to diverse interpretations. The assemblage from Koutroulou Magoula, a Middle Neolithic site – 5800-5300 BC – in central Greece (excavated under the co-direction of Prof. Yannis Hamilakis – University of Southampton/British School at Athens and Dr Kyparissi – Greek Ministry of Culture), offers a unique opportunity to revolutionise the way we study and understand

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  • DISSERTATIONS – Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica

    on Mar 16, 14 • in Archaeology, Bronze age, Greece, Neolithic, News, Pottery • with Comments Off on DISSERTATIONS – Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica

    Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica Margarita Nazou Year of VIVA: 2013 Description: 1 volume, 448 pages, colour & b/w figures, drawings, maps, 29.7×21 cm University: University College London (UCL) Country: United Kingdom Supervisor: Todd Whitelaw Other supervisors: Cyprian Broodbank, Andrew Bevan Examiners: Bill Sillar, Yiannis Papadatos Not yet published Aegean Library: Dig. Nazou phd 2013   Abstract Situated between mainland and island-defined archaeological entities, Attica has traditionally been treated as a transitional borderland between what is perceived as ‘Helladic’ versus ‘Cycladic’ culture. Most discussions of social

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  • 6,500-year old tin-bronze from Serbia

    on Jan 20, 14 • in Archaeology, Articles, Neolithic, News, Serbia • with Comments Off on 6,500-year old tin-bronze from Serbia

    The hypothesis of a single origin for Eurasian metallurgy has been challenged by the discovery of copper smelting evidence some 7000 years old at Plochnik, a Vincha culture settlement in eastern Serbia. Here, the tin-bronze foil was excavated from an undisturbed context, on the floor of a dwelling structure next to a copper workshop – a single occupation horizon dated to circa 4650 BCE. The tin-bronze foil from the site of Plochnik is therefore the earliest known tin-bronze artefact anywhere, extending the record of bronze making by about 1500 years. Two artefacts were analysed for

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