Archive for the ‘History’ Category

  • Grotesque Mummy Head Reveals Advanced Medieval Science

    on Mar 7, 13 • in Anthropology, History, Middle Ages, News • with Comments Off on Grotesque Mummy Head Reveals Advanced Medieval Science

    In the second century, an ethnically Greek Roman named Galen became doctor to the gladiators. His glimpses into the human body via these warriors’ wounds, combined with much more systematic dissections of animals, became the basis of Islamic and European medicine for centuries. Galen’s texts wouldn’t be challenged for anatomical supremacy until the Renaissance, when human dissections — often in public — surged in popularity. But doctors in medieval Europe weren’t as idle as it may seem, as a new analysis of the oldest-known preserved human dissection in Europe reveals. The gruesome specimen, now in a private

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  • Conference – The Fairest Meadows in the World: Crusades and Crusaders in the Balkans

    on Mar 5, 13 • in Archaeology, Bulgaria, Byzantine, Conference, History, Middle Ages, News • with Comments Off on Conference – The Fairest Meadows in the World: Crusades and Crusaders in the Balkans

    St. Cyril and St. Methodius University of Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria November 7th-9th, 2013 “The Fairest Meadows in the World”: Crusades and Crusaders in the Balkans The so-called “Baldwin’s Tower” at Tsarevets, Veliko Tarnovo Organized by Thomas Lecaque, Jake Ransohoff and the Chair of Ancient and Medieval History at the St. Cyril and St. Methodius University of Veliko Tarnovo With support from Marco Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies and the Department of History at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville The presence of the Crusades and Crusaders in the Balkans, from the eleventh to the fifteenth centuries, introduced a vast and

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  • Hagia Sophia: Facts, History & Architecture

    on Mar 2, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Byzantine, Christianity, Cultural heritage, Culture, History, Music, News, Ottoman period, Religion, Tourism, Turkey • with Comments Off on Hagia Sophia: Facts, History & Architecture

      The Hagia Sophia, whose name means “holy wisdom,” is a domed monument originally built as a cathedral in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) in the sixth century A.D. It contains two floors centered on a giant nave that has a great dome ceiling, along with smaller domes, towering above. “Hagia Sophia’s dimensions are formidable for any structure not built of steel,” writes Helen Gardner and Fred Kleiner in their book “Gardner’s Art Through the Ages: A Global History.” “In plan it is about 270 feet [82 meters] long and 240 feet [73 meters] wide. The

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  • The Knights of Malta: a thorn in the Ottomans’ side

    on Feb 25, 13 • in Byzantine, History, Middle Ages, News, Ottoman period, Turkey • with Comments Off on The Knights of Malta: a thorn in the Ottomans’ side

    For centuries, the Knights of Malta and the Ottomans were enemies. The knights have just celebrated their 900th anniversary and where once there was enmity toward the Turks, today there is cooperation If any of you happened to be watching “euronews” just three days before Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation, you might have seen a long procession of men wearing black cloaks with white Maltese crosses slowly moving into the St. Peter’s Basilica for a meeting with the pope. These were today’s Knights of Malta, officially the Order of Malta, the Sovereign Military Hospitaller

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  • Social status as reflected through metal objects found in archaic burials from Macedonia

    on Feb 24, 13 • in Ancient Greece, Antiquty, Archaeology, Art, Articles, Greece, Hellenistic period, History, News, Republic of Macedonia • with Comments Off on Social status as reflected through metal objects found in archaic burials from Macedonia

    Nathalie DEL SOCORRO Social Status as Reflected through Metal Objects Found in Archaic Burials from Macedonia Abstract Grave goods constitute a particularly important source of information about social status in periods where written sources are unavailable. They also allow us to get an idea of the beliefs expressed in the funerary rites they evoke. In the case of ancient Macedonia, they are major indicators of the changes that took place during the sixth and fifth centuries B.C. with the apparition of higher social classes. Among these grave goods, there are a number of imported objects which

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  • HAEMUS Journal – Call for Papers 2013

    on Feb 21, 13 • in Archaeology, Cultural heritage, History, Internet, News, Our Activity • with Comments Off on HAEMUS Journal – Call for Papers 2013

    Dear colleagues, As a publishers, we are pleased to announce a call for papers for the second issue of HAEMUS, an electronic journal devoted to the history and archaeology of the Balkan Peninsula. HAEMUS Journal welcomes research and review articles on all aspects of the history and archaeology of the Balkan Peninsula, from prehistory to modern times, including all interdisciplinary studies and studies of classical and modern scholarship within the scope of the Journal. All submissions should be based on original research or new interpretations, and should reflect the highest standards of scholarship. The journal

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