Archive for the ‘Greece’ Category

  • DISSERTATIONS – Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica

    on Mar 16, 14 • in Archaeology, Bronze age, Greece, Neolithic, News, Pottery • with Comments Off on DISSERTATIONS – Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica

    Defining the regional characteristics of Final Neolithic and Early Bronze Age pottery in Attica Margarita Nazou Year of VIVA: 2013 Description: 1 volume, 448 pages, colour & b/w figures, drawings, maps, 29.7×21 cm University: University College London (UCL) Country: United Kingdom Supervisor: Todd Whitelaw Other supervisors: Cyprian Broodbank, Andrew Bevan Examiners: Bill Sillar, Yiannis Papadatos Not yet published Aegean Library: Dig. Nazou phd 2013   Abstract Situated between mainland and island-defined archaeological entities, Attica has traditionally been treated as a transitional borderland between what is perceived as ‘Helladic’ versus ‘Cycladic’ culture. Most discussions of social

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  • Construction of Thessaloniki’s metro system has revealed wealth of archaeological finds

    on Jan 26, 14 • in Antiquty, Archaeology, Excavation, Greece, Roman period • with Comments Off on Construction of Thessaloniki’s metro system has revealed wealth of archaeological finds

    The Thessaloniki metro system aspires to be the “most modern metro system in the whole of Europe.” That, however, is contingent upon its completion. Begun in 2006, the project is currently four years behind schedule. In order to see the light of day, Thessaloniki’s archaeologists have had to chip away at the city’s shadowy past. The ruins unearthed in Greece’s second city have led some to hail it as a “second Pompeii.” Current excavations are focused on the so-called “intra muros” stations – those that sit within the limits of the city’s Theodosian walls –

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  • Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

    on Jan 21, 14 • in Archaeology, Cultural heritage, Greece, Management, News • with Comments Off on Can Privatization Save the Treasures of Ancient Greece?

    In the wake of government austerity, some closest to Greece’s treasures are advocating turning them over to private companies Many objects dug from the earth or drawn from the legends of Nemea could be used to promote the ancient Greek site: the mythological Nemean Lion slain by Hercules in the first of his seven feats; weights lifted by competitors during its ancient athletics; the bronze statue of the baby Opheltes, whose death is said to have inspired the games which rivaled those at Olympia further west. That no replicas exist and the gift stand at

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  • Roman chamber tomb found in ancient Corinth

    on Jan 2, 14 • in Ancient Rome, Archaeology, Architecture, Greece, News, Roman period • with Comments Off on Roman chamber tomb found in ancient Corinth

    A well-preserved and ornately decorated underground Roman tomb, complete with vaults and wall paintings, was found in Corinth during works to extend the Corinth-Patras national road, archaeologists said on Wednesday. The find came to light a bit more than a year after the revealing of another ornate Roman tomb in the same location. Measuring 3.30m by 2.63m., the tomb has been initially dated to between the 1st and 2nd centuries AD, but may be earlier. It was entered from the south through a staircase decorated on either side with two ceramic tiles in deep relief,

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  • THE BALKANS IN PREHISTORY

    on Dec 12, 13 • in Albania, Anthropology, Archaeology, Book, Bulgaria, Cultural heritage, Greece, Prehistory, Republic of Macedonia, Romania, Serbia • with Comments Off on THE BALKANS IN PREHISTORY

    This volume contains texts based on the lectures which took place in the NHRF’s Amphitheatre “Leonidas Zervas” during the period between October 23rd and November20th, 2000, under the title “The Balkans in Prehistory”. The guest lecturers are part of an elite of experts and established archaeologists, as well as directors of Archaeological Institutes or Museums from the regions of the Balkan Peninsula. THE BALKANS IN PREHISTORY by

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  • Conference focuses on return of Parthenon Sculptures

    on Nov 12, 13 • in Ancient Greece, Antiquty, Conference, Greece, Museum, News, UNESCO • with Comments Off on Conference focuses on return of Parthenon Sculptures

    Andrew Douglas Alexander Thomas Bruce is the descendant of Lord Elgin, who stole the Parthenon sculptures in the 19th century. The 11th Earl of Elgin has an entire ancient Greek throne and a sarcophagus in excellent condition decorating in his castle in Edinburgh. In an interview, he declared “my ancestor took away the marbles in an effort to save them,” adding that “in my life I have met Greece with a different view from Melina Mercouri on marbles issue. For this reason, I still think that I do not have to restore my ancestor’s memory.”

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