Archive for the ‘Greece’ Category

  • What was revealed today in Amphipolis

    on Aug 24, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Architecture, Art, Excavation, Greece, Hellenistic period, History, News • with Comments Off on What was revealed today in Amphipolis

    24. August.2014 What did the archaeologists found under the base of the Sphinxes – Decorating with blue and red paint on the monument New, important discoveries have been brought to “light” today’s excavations in a funerary monument, the tomb of the caste KH Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, in Amphipolis. After the removal of the marble slabs of the monument, which revealed the entire marble sphinxes, found at the entrance to the tomb, on Thursday the archaeligists removed with extreme caution soils which were behind the statues, at a depth of about two meters and wide

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  • 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    on Aug 22, 14 • in Archaeology, Archaic period, Architecture, Art, Bones, Excavation, Greece, News • with Comments Off on 2,800-Year-Old Zigzag Art Found in Greek Tomb

    Archaeologists working at the ancient city of Corinth, Greece, have discovered a tomb dating back around 2,800 years that has pottery decorated with zigzagging designs. The tomb was built sometime between 800 B.C. and 760 B.C., a time when Corinth was emerging as a major power and Greeks were colonizing the coasts of the Mediterranean Sea. The tomb itself consists of a shaft and burial pit, the pit having a limestone sarcophagus that is about 5.8 feet (1.76 meters) long, 2.8 feet (0.86 m) wide and 2.1 feet (0.63 m) high. When researchers opened the

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  • Faunal Remains from Pigi Athinas, a Late Neolithic Settlement in Aegean (Thessaly, Greece)

    on Aug 7, 14 • in Articles, Bioarchaeology, Bones, Greece, News • with Comments Off on Faunal Remains from Pigi Athinas, a Late Neolithic Settlement in Aegean (Thessaly, Greece)

    Jean Cantuel Faunal Remains from Pigi Athinas, a Late Neolithic Settlement in Aegean (Thessaly, Greece) Abstract The zooarchaeological study of the settlement of Pigi Athinas shows a significant proportion occupied by cattle compared to other animals, which seems original in the Aegean world where breeding is usually based on caprines (goat and sheep). Also, this study helps us to better understand animal use and, the way of life of the Neolithic population.   Keywords: Zooarchaeology, Neolithic, Greece, Breeding strategy, Environment Reference: CANTUEL J., Faunal Remains from Pigi Athinas, a Late Neolithic Settlement in Aegean (Thessaly, Greece), Haemus journal Vol.

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  • World’s earliest erotic graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean island

    on Jul 8, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Archaeology, Art, Greece, News • with Comments Off on World’s earliest erotic graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean island

    Racy inscriptions and phalluses carved into Astypalaia’s rocky peninsula shed light on very private lives of ancient Greece Wild, windswept, rocky and remote, Astypalaia is not an obvious place for the unearthing of some of the world’s earliest erotic graffiti. Certainly, Dr Andreas Vlachopoulos, a specialist in prehistoric archaeology, didn’t think so when he began fieldwork on the Aegean island four years ago. Until he chanced upon a couple of racy inscriptions and large phalluses carved into Astypalaia’s rocky peninsula at Vathy. The inscriptions, both dating to the fifth and sixth centuries BC, were “so

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  • Bringing the Neolithic Figurines of Koutroulou Magoula Back to Life

    on Apr 7, 14 • in Archaeology, Greece, Neolithic, News • with Comments Off on Bringing the Neolithic Figurines of Koutroulou Magoula Back to Life

    Clay Neolithic figurines are some of the most enigmatic archaeological objects, which depict in a miniature form humans, animals, other anthropomorphic or zoomorphic beings, and often hybrid or indeterminate entities. Figurines have excited scholarly and public imagination, and have given rise to diverse interpretations. The assemblage from Koutroulou Magoula, a Middle Neolithic site – 5800-5300 BC – in central Greece (excavated under the co-direction of Prof. Yannis Hamilakis – University of Southampton/British School at Athens and Dr Kyparissi – Greek Ministry of Culture), offers a unique opportunity to revolutionise the way we study and understand

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  • More on Burials in Greece linked to Macedonian kings

    on Mar 19, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Anthropology, Antiquty, Archaeology, Greece, News • with Comments Off on More on Burials in Greece linked to Macedonian kings

       Funeral mourning representation (left) and Maenad mask (right) found after excavations at the Royal Necropolis of Aegae, Vergina [Credit: ΑΠΕ-ΜΠΕ/ΥΠΠΟ/STR] The director of the 17th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities Angeliki Kottaridi believes that the five tombs discovered in Vergina could belong to members of the Temenid dynast or even King Cassander himself. Mrs. Kottaridi made the bold revelation at the Thursday afternoon conference at the University of Thessaloniki. Cassander was one of Alexander the Great’s successors and husband to his sister, Thessaloniki, who established the Antipatrid dynasty. King Cassander became known for

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