Archive for the ‘Christianity’ Category

  • Hagia Sophia: Facts, History & Architecture

    on Mar 2, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Byzantine, Christianity, Cultural heritage, Culture, History, Music, News, Ottoman period, Religion, Tourism, Turkey • with Comments Off on Hagia Sophia: Facts, History & Architecture

      The Hagia Sophia, whose name means “holy wisdom,” is a domed monument originally built as a cathedral in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey) in the sixth century A.D. It contains two floors centered on a giant nave that has a great dome ceiling, along with smaller domes, towering above. “Hagia Sophia’s dimensions are formidable for any structure not built of steel,” writes Helen Gardner and Fred Kleiner in their book “Gardner’s Art Through the Ages: A Global History.” “In plan it is about 270 feet [82 meters] long and 240 feet [73 meters] wide. The

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  • Mud may have preserved Turkish city 700 years ago, archaeologists say

    on Jan 22, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Byzantine, Christianity, History, Middle Ages, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Mud may have preserved Turkish city 700 years ago, archaeologists say

    DEMRE, Turkey — In the fourth century A.D., a bishop named Nicholas transformed the city of Myra, on the Mediterranean coast of what is now Turkey, into a Christian capital. Nicholas was later canonized, becoming the St. Nicholas of Christmas fame. Myra had a much unhappier fate. After some 800 years as an important pilgrimage site in the Byzantine Empire it vanished — buried under 18 feet of mud from the rampaging Myros River. All that remained was the Church of St. Nicholas, parts of a Roman amphitheater and tombs cut into the rocky hills

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  • Temple of Poseidon found in Bulgaria’s Sozopol

    on Dec 16, 12 • in Archaeology, Bulgaria, Christianity, Middle Ages, News, Religion, Roman period • with Comments Off on Temple of Poseidon found in Bulgaria’s Sozopol

    One of the buildings excavated in the Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol appears to have been a temple to Poseidon, going by the discovery of a large and relatively well-preserved altar to the Greek god. This is according to Bozhidar Dimitrov, director of Bulgaria’s National History Museum. Archaeologists found the building in front of the medieval fortified wall of the seaside town, Dimitrov said. He said that the numerous pieces of marble found during excavations indicate that after the declaration of Christianity as the office religion of the Roman empire in 330 CE, the

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  • Basilica from the time of Constantine the Great found at Sofia’s Serdica West Gate

    on Dec 13, 12 • in Architecture, Bulgaria, Christianity, History, News, Roman period • with Comments Off on Basilica from the time of Constantine the Great found at Sofia’s Serdica West Gate

    Archaeologists in Bulgaria’s capital city Sofia have found a basilica said to date from the time of emperor Constantine the Great in the area of the West Gate of Serdica, as the city was known in Roman times. The basilica is 27 metres wide and about 100m long, according to Yana Borissova-Katsarova, head of research at the site. It featured multi-coloured mosaics. Further exploration of the find will be difficult because of its location under the modern city. Sofia deputy mayor in charge of culture, Todor Chobanov, said that the discovery of the basilica may

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  • Stobi

    on Nov 9, 12 • in Ancient Rome, Antiquty, Christianity, Cultural heritage, Late antique, Republic of Macedonia, Roman period • with No Comments

    In the Ancient theater (II century AD) listening the music performance The Roman city of Stobi in Republic of Macedonia is located on the main road that leads from the Danube to the Aegean Sea, at the place where the Erigón river (mod. River Crna) joins the Axiós river (mod. Vardar), making it important strategically as a center for both trade and warfare. The pre-Roman period comprises Stobi (near Gradsko) as an ancient town of Paionia, later conquered by Macedon. The first excavation were done from 1924 to 1936 by The Museum of Belgrade when

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