Archive for the ‘Bronze age’ Category

  • Catastrophic Climate Change Ends Bronze Age Civilisation

    on Aug 20, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Bronze age, Greece, News • with Comments Off on Catastrophic Climate Change Ends Bronze Age Civilisation

    Archaeologists have long debated what caused the Late Bronze Age (LBA) world of the Eastern Mediterranean, a rich network of Aegean, Egyptian, Syro-Palestinian and Hittite civilizations to collapse about 1300 BC. Many scholars have cited warfare, political unrest and natural disaster as factors. But a new study supports the theory that climate change was largely responsible. Collapse of cultures Pollen grains from Cyprus provided the clue that a huge drought hit the region about 3,200 years ago. Inscriptions and clay tablets have described crop failures, famines and war all occurring during the same timeframe, suggesting

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  • 300-Year Drought Was Downfall of Ancient Greece

    on Aug 16, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Bronze age, Greece, News, Prehistory • with Comments Off on 300-Year Drought Was Downfall of Ancient Greece

    A 300-year drought may have caused the demise of several Mediterranean cultures, including ancient Greece, new research suggests. A sharp drop in rainfall may have led to the collapse of several eastern Mediterranean civilizations, including ancient Greece, around 3,200 years ago. The resulting famine and conflict may help explain why the entire Hittite culture, chariot-riding people who ruled most of the region of Anatolia, vanished from the planet, according to a study published (Aug. 14) in the journal PLOS ONE. Lost golden period Even during the heyday of Classical Greek civilization, there were hints of

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  • Kültepe digs may reveal new written documents

    on Jun 25, 13 • in Archaeology, Bronze age, Excavation, News, Turkey • with Comments Off on Kültepe digs may reveal new written documents

    This year the Kültepe archaeological excavations will once again continue in Kayseri. The head of the excavations says the works will particularly focus on an area from the Bronze Age The archaeological excavations that started in 1948 at the Karum tumulus of the Kültepe/Kaniş province of the central province of Kayseri are still ongoing around 20 kilometers from the Kayseri-Sivas highway. The head of the Kültepe excavations, Professor Fikri Kulakoğlu, told Anatolia news agency some details about the works. “We are planning to work in an area of the Bronze Age, about 5,000 years earlier

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  • Archaeologists Explore Early Bronze Age Settlement on Greek Island of Keros

    on Apr 28, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Art, Bronze age, Greece, News • with Comments Off on Archaeologists Explore Early Bronze Age Settlement on Greek Island of Keros

    Keros Island. It is known for the famous assemblage of fragmentary Cycladic marble figurines popularly known as the “Keros Hoard”, a collection of artifacts purportedly found by looters at the site of Kavos on the west coast of this now uninhabited Greek island in the Cyclades, southeast of Naxos in the Mediterranean. Many of the figurines, traded on the antiquities market, ended up in the Erlenmeyer Collection in Basel, Switzerland, with the rest dispersed among various museums and private collections. The figurines were said to have inspired the work of Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore

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  • Did an Earthquake Destroy Ancient Greece?

    on Apr 25, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Bronze age, Greece, History, News • with Comments Off on Did an Earthquake Destroy Ancient Greece?

    The grand Mycenaens, the first Greeks, inspired the legends of the Trojan Wars, “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey.” Their culture abruptly declined around 1200 B.C., marking the start of a Dark Ages in Greece. The disappearance of the Mycenaens is a Mediterranean mystery. Leading explanations include warfare with invaders or uprising by lower classes. Some scientists also think one of the country’s frequent earthquakes could have contributed to the culture’s collapse. At the ruins of Tiryns, a fortified palace, geologists hope to find evidence to confirm whether an earthquake was a likely culprit. Tiryns was

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  • Knossos: Palace of the Minoans

    on Mar 19, 13 • in Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Bronze age, Cultural heritage, Greece, News • with Comments Off on Knossos: Palace of the Minoans

    The Palace of Knossos is located just south of modern-day Heraklion near the north coast of Crete. Built by a civilization that we call the Minoans, it covers about 150,000 square feet (14,000 square meters) of space, the size of more than two American football fields, and was surrounded by a town in antiquity. The site came to prominence in the early 20th century when it was excavated and restored by a team led by British archaeologist Arthur Evans. The chronology of the palace is a matter of scholarly debate. Construction of the palace appears

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