Archive for the ‘Anthropology’ Category

  • True Love: Ancient Romeo And Juliet Found In Romania

    on Apr 30, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, News, Romania • with Comments Off on True Love: Ancient Romeo And Juliet Found In Romania

    Archaeologists investigating a Dominican monastery courtyard found, as media refers to them, Romanian Romeo and Juliet. The skeletons found belong to a young couple who was buried holding hands. Experts from the Institute of Archaeology of Cluj-Napoca are currently investigating the site, which was presumably used as a cemetery, but their attention is primarily drawn to two skeletons, because the double burials in this period have been extremely rare. ‘This is a mystery and a rarity. We see that the man suffered a serious hip injury from which he probably died, and we assume that

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  • From desk drawer to top-drawer: the Cotsen turns 40

    on Apr 30, 13 • in Albania, Anthropology, Archaeology, News, Tradition • with Comments Off on From desk drawer to top-drawer: the Cotsen turns 40

    The 1973 beginnings of UCLA’s Institute of Archaeology hardly signaled greatness. Its annual budget was a paltry $6,000. Founding director Giorgio Buccellati had a staff of one, a part-time assistant who worked a few hours a week. The institute didn’t have a home. “We didn’t even have a room,” Buccellati recently recalled with a laugh, much less a building. “We just had a drawer — in my desk.” From these humble beginnings has grown one of the world’s largest consortia of working archaeologists, including some 30 UCLA professors from 11 different disciplines. They work alongside

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  • Archaeologists Explore Early Bronze Age Settlement on Greek Island of Keros

    on Apr 28, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Art, Bronze age, Greece, News • with Comments Off on Archaeologists Explore Early Bronze Age Settlement on Greek Island of Keros

    Keros Island. It is known for the famous assemblage of fragmentary Cycladic marble figurines popularly known as the “Keros Hoard”, a collection of artifacts purportedly found by looters at the site of Kavos on the west coast of this now uninhabited Greek island in the Cyclades, southeast of Naxos in the Mediterranean. Many of the figurines, traded on the antiquities market, ended up in the Erlenmeyer Collection in Basel, Switzerland, with the rest dispersed among various museums and private collections. The figurines were said to have inspired the work of Pablo Picasso and Henry Moore

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  • The Image of Early Medieval Barbaroi in Contemporary Written Sources and Modern Scholarship: the Balkan Perspective

    on Apr 8, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Articles, Late antique, Middle Ages, News • with Comments Off on The Image of Early Medieval Barbaroi in Contemporary Written Sources and Modern Scholarship: the Balkan Perspective

    Jelena JARIĆ The Image of Early Medieval Barbaroi in Contemporary Written Sources and Modern Scholarship: the Balkan Perspective Abstract The barbarians of the Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages were of scholarly interest from the 19th c. onwards. Though there are numerous publications on various aspects of the barbarians, most of it focuses on the role they had in the collapse of the Western and the trails of the Eastern Roman Empire. During the last two decades, an enormous scholarly contribution is given into dampening the negative representation of the Early Medieval barbarians as primitive,

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  • The Lion of Amphipolis

    on Apr 6, 13 • in Anthropology, Antiquty, Art, Cultural heritage, Greece, News • with Comments Off on The Lion of Amphipolis

    A trademark for the Greek regional unit of Serres and a symbol of Macedonia, the Lion of Amphipolis is undoubtedly one of the most significant preserved monuments of the 4th century BC. It has been restored and stands next to the old bridge of Strymonas river at the regional street Amphipolis-Serraiki Akti. After the last discovery of the funerary enclosure of the “Kasta” mound in ancient Amphipolis, according to the research results of the 28th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, the burial monument of the Lion is closely related to the grave marker of

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  • The Most Significant Findings of Macedonian Archaeology

    on Mar 28, 13 • in Anthropology, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Cultural heritage, Lecturing, News, Republic of Macedonia • with Comments Off on The Most Significant Findings of Macedonian Archaeology

    Sponsored by Republic of Macedonia and ARCHAEOLOGY magazine Monday, April 29, 2013 – 6:30pm – 9:30pm Location: Scandinavia House 58 Park Avenue (between 38th & 39th) New York, NY 10016 United States Price: $25 for AIA members, $35 for non-members Buy tickets  Lecturer: Dragi Mitrevski, PhD Professor Dragi Mitrevski is a renowned Macedonian archaeologist and professor of Prehistoric Archaeology and classic Archaeology and Methodology of archaeological research at the Faculty of Philosophy of Skopje – Department of Art History and Archeology (the oldest Higher Education Institution in the Republic of Macedonia). Since 2005, he has been Head of the Institute for

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