Archive for the ‘Ancient Rome’ Category

  • HOW TO DECODE AN ANCIENT ROMAN’S HANDWRITING

    on May 2, 17 • in Ancient Rome, Archaeology, Culture, History, News • with Comments Off

    Higgins-TheoldestwritinginBritain2-320

    Between 2010 and 2014, archeologists digging in London’s financial district, on the site of a new British headquarters for Bloomberg, made an astonishing discovery—a collection of more than four hundred wooden tablets, preserved in the muck of an underground river. The tablets, postcard-sized sheets of fir, spruce, and larch, dated mainly from a couple of decades after the Roman conquest of Britain, in A.D. 43, straddling the period, in the reign of Nero, when Boudica’s rebellion very nearly got rid of the occupation altogether. Eighty of them carried legible texts—legible, that is, to Roger Tomlin,

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  • Io Saturnalia! – Event by HAEMUS

    on Dec 1, 16 • in Ancient Rome, Cultural heritage, Culture, Education, Management, News, Our Activity, Republic of Macedonia, Roman period, Tradition • with Comments Off

    haemus_scupini_romani_saturnalia

    In order to promote and popularize the cultural heritage of the Аncient Roman period as a part of the “SCUPINI ROMANI”, a brand of “HAEMUS” – Center for Scientific Research and Promotion of Culture dedicated to the  Аncient Roman culture, the event inspired by the ancient Roman festival Saturnalia will be organize. Within the event we will have several activities: - Educative part about the Ancient Roman Saturnalia - Tasting mulsum (Ancient Roman wine with honey and spices) - Tasting the Ancient Roman food - Reciting the poetry of the Ancient Roman poets - Thematic Poetry slam in

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  • Mystery magic spells unearthed with ancient skeletons in Serbia

    on Aug 11, 16 • in Ancient Rome, Anthropology, Archaeology, Archaic period, Architecture, Art, Coins, Excavation, History, News, Roman period, Serbia • with Comments Off

    View of amulets uncovered by Serbian archeologists at the Viminacium site

    Archaeologists are trying to decipher magic spells etched onto tiny rolls of gold and silver that they found alongside skeletons of humans buried almost 2,000 years ago. “The alphabet is Greek, that much we know. The language is Aramaic – it’s a Middle Eastern mystery to us,” Miomir Korac, chief archaeologist at the site in eastern Serbia, told Reuters. The skeletons were found at the foot of a massive coal-fired power station where searches are being carried out before another unit of the electricity plant is built on the site of an ancient Roman city

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  • Archaeological Site of Philippi inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site

    on Jul 17, 16 • in Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Antiquty, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Greece, Hellenistic period, News, Tourism, UNESCO • with Comments Off

    Archaeological_Site_of_Philippi_UNESCO

    Archaeological Site of Philippi on 17. July 2016 was inscribed as World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The remains of this walled city lie at the foot of an acropolis in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, on the ancient route linking Europe and Asia, the Via Egnatia. Founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II, the city developed as a “small Rome” with the establishment of the Roman Empire in the decades following the Battle of Philippi, in 42 BCE. The Hellenistic theatre and funerary heroon (temple) were supplemented with Roman

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  • Archaeologists Explore Ancient Roman Forum of Philippopolis

    on May 26, 14 • in Ancient Rome, Bulgaria, News, Roman period • with Comments Off

    A view of the Roman Theater of Philippopolis

    Located in south central Bulgaria, the city of Plovdiv, known to many as the “Eternal City of Bulgaria”, is among the oldest cities in Europe, with evidence of human settlement going back 6,000 years. Established first as the Thracian settlement of Eumolpia, today its ancient remains near the city center are most often identified with the name Philippopolis by archaeologists. That was the name given to the city after it was Hellenized within the Macedonian Empire under Philip II during the 4th century, B.C.E. But its most visible ancient remains took shape when the city

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  • A hidden treasure in the Mediterranean: The ‘Man Rocks’

    on Apr 18, 14 • in Ancient Rome, Antiquty, Archaeology, History, News, Roman period, Turkey • with Comments Off

    The reliefs on the rocks are thought to have been made over the course of around 250 years. AA photos

      The Adam Kayalar (man-rocks), located on the sheer slopes of the Şeytan Deresi Valley in the southern province of Mersin, often take visitors by surprise with their large-scale human reliefs, which are estimated to have been made between the first century B.C. and the second century A.D. The rocks are made up of 11 males, four females, two children, an ibex and Roman eagle reliefs in nine niches. Ümit Aydınoğlu, an associate professor in the Archaeology Department of Mersin University, said the Adam Kayalar are completely unique in Anatolia. As the Adam Kayalar region

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