Archive for the ‘Ancient Greece’ Category

  • Archaeological Site of Philippi inscribed as UNESCO World Heritage Site

    on Jul 17, 16 • in Ancient Greece, Ancient Rome, Antiquty, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Greece, Hellenistic period, News, Tourism, UNESCO • with Comments Off

    Archaeological_Site_of_Philippi_UNESCO

    Archaeological Site of Philippi on 17. July 2016 was inscribed as World Heritage Site by UNESCO. The remains of this walled city lie at the foot of an acropolis in the present-day region of Eastern Macedonia and Thrace, on the ancient route linking Europe and Asia, the Via Egnatia. Founded in 356 BC by the Macedonian King Philip II, the city developed as a “small Rome” with the establishment of the Roman Empire in the decades following the Battle of Philippi, in 42 BCE. The Hellenistic theatre and funerary heroon (temple) were supplemented with Roman

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  • Archaeologists Discover Ancient Greek Homes, Artifacts in Old Town of Bulgaria’s Sozopol

    on Jul 15, 15 • in Ancient Greece, Anthropology, Antiquty, Art, Bulgaria, Classical period, Excavation, Hellenistic period, History, News • with Comments Off

    Sozopol-Old-Town-9

    Ancient Greek homes from the Classical Age and the Hellenistic Age as well as more artifacts such as coins and pottery have been discovered by archaeologists excavating a municipally-owned property in the Old Town in Bulgaria’s Black Sea resort Sozopol, once the Ancient Greek colony of Apollonia Pontica. The discoveries have been made on the spot of an old home in Sozopol’s Old Town, one of several houses that perished in fires in the last few years. The old house in question had been the property of Bulgaria’s National Revenue Agency until a few years

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  • Remains of 5 people found in Amphipolis tomb

    on Jan 20, 15 • in Ancient Greece, Anthropology, Antiquty, Archaeology, Architecture, Art, Bones, Excavation, Greece, News • with Comments Off

    Bones belonging to the 60-year-old female in the Amphipolis tomb. Credit: Ministry of Culture

    The Greek Ministry of Culture has announced the long-awaited results of the analysis on the bones found inside the 4th century BC tomb uncovered in Amphipolis in northern Greece, and the news is quite unexpected – the bones belong to not one, but five individuals, pointing to the likelihood that it is a family tomb. The tomb is located within Kasta Hill in what was once the ancient city of Amphipolis, conquered by Philip II of Macedon, father of Alexander the Great, in 357 BC. Experts have known about the existence of the burial mound

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  • Oracles of Dionysos in Ancient Thrace

    on Oct 8, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Antiquty, Articles, Bulgaria, News, Religion • with Comments Off

    Iliev-Oracles-of-Dionysos-in-Ancient-Thrace

    Jordan ILIEV Oracles of Dionysos in Ancient Thrace Abstract The focus of the article is the available information about the oracles of Dionysos in ancient Thrace. After a careful analysis of the currently know sources the author states that in the ancient Thracian lands there was not only one or two (as most modern scholars assume) but several oracles of Dionysos. The author proves this point by giving a special attention to some details in the ancient information, such as the localization of the different oracles, the features of the mantic session, the officials etc

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  • What was revealed today in Amphipolis

    on Aug 24, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Architecture, Art, Excavation, Greece, Hellenistic period, History, News • with Comments Off

    Amphipolis 3

    24. August.2014 What did the archaeologists found under the base of the Sphinxes – Decorating with blue and red paint on the monument New, important discoveries have been brought to “light” today’s excavations in a funerary monument, the tomb of the caste KH Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities, in Amphipolis. After the removal of the marble slabs of the monument, which revealed the entire marble sphinxes, found at the entrance to the tomb, on Thursday the archaeligists removed with extreme caution soils which were behind the statues, at a depth of about two meters and wide

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  • World’s earliest erotic graffiti found in unlikely setting on Aegean island

    on Jul 8, 14 • in Ancient Greece, Archaeology, Art, Greece, News • with Comments Off

    Erotic graffiti on Aegean island of Astypalaia

    Racy inscriptions and phalluses carved into Astypalaia’s rocky peninsula shed light on very private lives of ancient Greece Wild, windswept, rocky and remote, Astypalaia is not an obvious place for the unearthing of some of the world’s earliest erotic graffiti. Certainly, Dr Andreas Vlachopoulos, a specialist in prehistoric archaeology, didn’t think so when he began fieldwork on the Aegean island four years ago. Until he chanced upon a couple of racy inscriptions and large phalluses carved into Astypalaia’s rocky peninsula at Vathy. The inscriptions, both dating to the fifth and sixth centuries BC, were “so

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